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AuTalkz - Personal Space by mdchan AuTalkz - Personal Space by mdchan
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AuTalkz is protected under Copyright and Trademark Law.

If you like this artwork and wish to help support me in doing them, please take a look at my patreon page at www.patreon.com/mdchan
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:iconnuclearburrito:
NuclearBurrito Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I have a question about how I should approach a situation. I like to volunteer at the archery station at a cub scout day camp, and a while ago, I became aware that one of the kids had autism. There were probably others, but this kid, to whom I'm going to refer to as SR, kind of stood out (in fact, the only reason I'm aware about SR is because one of the leaders told me). He was actually rather accurate, but only horizontally; all of his shots were either too high or too low. It didn't help that his dad was "aiding" him the first day and getting frustrated, and SR seemed to be impatient, even after I took over for his dad. For example, he would nock an arrow and fire before fully drawing it back and aiming, and often before I could try to help adjust his aim. Also, for some reason, he seemed to have trouble drawing the arrow all the way back, but when I pointed it out or went to assist in pulling it back, he had no trouble.

 My question is, how would you approach the situation? What I wanted to do, and what the range master suggested, was helping SR aim by physically adjusting his arm and stance. I was out of things to say to help, and his lack of consistent vertical aim frustrated him to the point of a meltdown at the very end of the week. For the most part, he seemed comfortable with me, at least more so than the other helpers (probably because I was the only one willing to work with him), and I did actually nudge his arm once or twice, but I'm still not sure if he would be fine with what I suggested for a longer period of time.
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:iconmdchan:
mdchan Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
I'm really not sure.

Perhaps show him how to draw the bow (with no arrow nocked, of course)?

Some kids with autism seem alright with physical corrections (when I worked at a preschool, an autistic kid gravitated towards me and I helped him adjust his grip on a paintbrush a few times), while others pull away from that sort of thing be it because of personal space, SPD to touch, or just pride.
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:iconnuclearburrito:
NuclearBurrito Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, at the beginning of the week, I generally demonstrate to each group how to draw a bow, including explaining how to keep each draw relatively consistent (not sure why I'm always the one to do it; it just seems to work better that way). Are you suggesting I show him again, in a more one-on-one setting?

Like I said before, he seemed fine with me touching him occasionally, or at least he didn't complain when I did. Of course, I did miss the last week, and since none of the other counselors/helpers knew many names, they couldn't tell me how it went.
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:iconashachu2013:
ashachu2013 Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2014  Student Digital Artist
My sis is one of the people i don't really let in. She goes mental with trying to hug me out of the blue. I am one who doesn't really like that without warning.
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:iconoddball-dragonfly:
Oddball-Dragonfly Featured By Owner Jun 24, 2015  Student General Artist
Your sis sounds EXACTLY like my lil bro when he was younger... I had push him away a LOT.
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:iconmdchan:
mdchan Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
My brother stopped hugging me when I kept pulling away.  We have a good relationship for siblings, but it was just something out of my comfort zone.
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:iconashachu2013:
ashachu2013 Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2014  Student Digital Artist
I have a good relationship with my sister. It's just that whenever she tries to hug me it just gets way out of my comfort zone. I always told her to knock it off or tell me when she wants to. But I stopped saying that because of two reasons. 1. she ends telling my parents that I hate her. Which in turn never ends out good, and 2. She never listens. Also I tried pulling away she just keeps coming after me.
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:iconminecrafroger:
minecrafroger Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
i agree, expeshonly with the last 2, i like hugs, infact i wold love to have my first kiss allready. :(
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:iconmdchan:
mdchan Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
I still don't get what's so great or special about kissing (outside of romance writing or anime; I do sometimes cheer aloud when two of my favorite characters finally kiss and admit they love each other already).

As in, I wouldn't want to do it; it still seems gross to me.  I also don't understand why folks feel the need to express their love with deep kissing (or, as I see it, "swapping spit") or making love.  I don't understand the physical aspect of relationships.
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:iconminecrafroger:
minecrafroger Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
well. with the phisicle as in phisicol atratshon thing (like big boobs), i don't get. but otherthings, i kindof get.
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:iconthe-badger-wolf:
The-Badger-Wolf Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2014
I have friends that are like Kairy-wolf. Dawww, he looks cute in the fourth panel.
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:iconautisticicelandic98:
AutisticIcelandic98 Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
This is so true.
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:iconlopsidelibby:
lopsidelibby Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013  Student Digital Artist
I remember this situation from 5th grade. One friend wrote a really mean letter to someone else. Not a friend, but I didn't dislike her. She cried sooo much. I felt awful about it, so I hugged her during class, when she read it. The friend got suspended.
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:iconcelinedgd:
CelineDGD Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
Yes, just...yes.
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:iconaorta-heartless:
Aorta-Heartless Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
Agreed, Not really autistic here but I understand the need for a bit of personal space.
I will say that taking mass transit means lack of personal space though.
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:iconmdchan:
mdchan Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
Agreed, there.  I like riding trains as long as I can find a place to sit, as arm rests are like natural dividers.  But the subways, though fun to ride when it's not busy, are a nightmare.
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:iconaorta-heartless:
Aorta-Heartless Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013
Again, I understand. Bus systems can be just as bad sometimes, though I live on a route that is usually only full during rush hour so I'm lucky.
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:iconjerrekedb:
Jerrekedb Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
This is so like me :d
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:iconreddredpanda:
ReddRedPanda Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
I like my bubble. :iconbubbleplz: Unfortunately people don't like to respect my bubble. I don't know why but I seem to always run into those people that just hug you randomly for no reason whether they really know you or not. :X
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:iconmdchan:
mdchan Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
I used to freeze up even when friends hugged me (all except for one friend), or if people I'm still getting to know hug me.  There are a couple friends of the family whom we've known for a couple years, and I'm just now starting to not freeze up (as much) when they hug me.

Family get-togethers used to terrify me when I was little and forced into going.
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:iconcursedironfist7:
cursedironfist7 Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
that is me when i was a little kid.
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:iconkuraithelion:
Kuraithelion Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
I must say, every single time I read one of these things, it gives me a larger understanding into the life of others (especially the people I know) and I realize just how important the friends we make are to us. We let them in this bubble, and are supported by them. And people who are outside the bubble can be let in, through trust. Another amazing and inspiring strip.
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:iconmdchan:
mdchan Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
It makes me happy to hear that!

And, I really like your insightful and true statement about the friends whom we let into our bubbles.  Very true.  ^^
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:iconslickcoolbuizle:
slickcoolbuizle Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
hugs* a life lesson
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:iconlandonbay:
landonbay Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
aww....Kairy is cutest in this :3

and if you cannot open the bubble, then expand it :3
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:iconchiminix:
Chiminix Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
Have you done one about all the people here who claim to have it (either for attention or out of ignorance) but really don't?
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:iconmdchan:
mdchan Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
I'm a little hesitant to do something like that, actually.

I've encountered folks like that, as well as ones who claim to have outgrown it (more the latter than the former).  It might be offensive if I'm not careful.  The folks who do it for attention...welp, they deserve to be slammed for posing without understanding (cause nobody really ever wants a disability; I say that I wouldn't give up my autism, but I still didn't ask to be born with that or crippling anxiety attacks).
At one point, I might have slammed those folks...when AuTalkz was more of a satire, I might have done it since I wasn't worried about some controversial issues being pointed out.  AuTalkz as it is, now...I'm not sure.

But the ones who say they outgrew it, I wouldn't slam.  There are people like that with ADD/ADHD, too, and the problem was that there was a "diagnosis craze", and people were being misdiagnosed.  When I was in elementary school, there was the ADD/ADHD craze, and Ritalin was being prescribed to almost everyone (thankfully, the only diagnosis I had back then was OCD, and my parents refused to put me on any medication while I was young).
Then, the majority of those kids would seemingly outgrow their ADD.  Today, it's the same with Asperger's; most of the people being diagnosed will probably "outgrow" it.

In other words, they never had it to begin with.  People who are shy or introverted are mistakenly diagnosed as having Asperger's, when there's a LOT more to the disorder than just being "shy".  It's social impairment, which certainly isn't the same thing.

So, yea, I'm passionate about that subject, and I might be able to stay relatively objective in a comic on it, but it could be insulting to people.  On the other hand, there's a real danger of history repeating itself if folks don't realize it and speak up.  Only this time, there thankfully isn't a "cure all" medication for Asperger's like Ritalin was to ADD years and years ago.

Conclusion: I might do one about the overdiagnosis of Asperger's/ASD, but I'm not sure that the "new" AuTalkz should get into slamming the fakers.
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December 18, 2013
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